Papers in the Attic

The Study of Ancient Chaldean & Necronomicon Mysticism

The End of an Era: The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan

The End of an Era!

The End of an Era!

I would like to wish everyone a warm beautiful day! If this is your first time here, please feel free to take the time out to share some of your insights and experiences. Also check our menu appearing on the right column for additional articles and information. Today, we have seen the end of an era. “Messiah’el Bey of Warlock Asylum fame released his last writing on mysticism this evening. The work will soon by available on Amazon before the week is out, but readers can get advanced copies on Createspace. Some say it is his best esoteric work as yet. We would like to congratulate him on this accomplishment. It’s not an everyday thing for someone to publish a version of the Yi Jing.”

Copies will be available on Amazon before the week’s end. Advanced copies can be obtained at the following link:

https://www.createspace.com/4446578

The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan is a working companion of the Ivory Tablets of the Crow and a rare translation of the I Ching (Book of Changes). Originally, it was thought to be circulated and developed by members of Black Dragon Society in their investigation of the Art of Ninzuwu (Yi Jing Sorcery).The Art of Ninzuwu is a very powerful transformational process and is said to be one of the oldest forms of magical practice in the world.

The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan also reveals the historical authenticity of what appears in the Ivory Tablets of the Crow and how it is applied to Yi Jing divination. The book gives a thorough, yet mystical, explanation of each of the sixty-four hexagrams and compares them to the Sixty-Four Letters of Genghis Khan. The book also explores the spiritual side of Genghis Khan and his connections to shamanism. Formulas for accessing the vibration of the hexagrams are given, as well as, advanced initiatory practices of Ninzuwu.

The book also examines the Yi Jing’s relationship to ancient Sumerian spirituality and reveals the location of the legendary land of Dilmun, and the possibility of a Yi Jing originating in ancient Mesopotamia. The also book reveals the origin of the Sumerians and where they migrated to after leaving Mesopotamia. Many people who presently use the I Ching in their lives will find this text truly rewarding. Others will now be able to validate the historical authenticity of what appears in the Ivory Tablets of the Crow. People, regardless of their political, racial, religious, and spiritual background can gain some wisdom from the Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan.

Another theme that is prominent in the text is the Yi Ching’s relationship to Shinto and the fundamental creed of the Black Dragon Society. The Appendix includes excerpts from a speech given prominent member of the Black Dragon Society and his views on Dr. Mikao Usui.

Caution: The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan is also an advanced initiatory path. The Hexagrams are arranged in the order of their initiatory steps. The editor suggests that the book be read first in its entirety before practice.

We wish Warlock the best in all his endeavors!

Simon Magus

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8 Responses

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  1. the link goes to a wrong web page brother.

    Rafael Barrio

    October 12, 2013 at 1:00 am

  2. delusions of a mad man . . . authored by a warlock in an asylum . . . go figure

    starintelligence

    October 12, 2013 at 11:01 pm

  3. ….. would be nice if you could give some constructive criticism.

    aruirkalla

    October 13, 2013 at 6:40 am

  4. The words of a true betrayer…. Spoken by a sad loner with a jealous heart…. Go fuck yourself!

    Dumu Abzu-a

    October 13, 2013 at 6:42 am

  5. The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan is a working companion of the Ivory Tablets of the Crow and a rare translation of the I Ching (Book of Changes). Originally, it was thought to be circulated and developed by members of Black Dragon Society in their investigation of the Art of Ninzuwu (Yi Jing Sorcery).The Art of Ninzuwu is a very powerful transformaional process and is said to be one of the oldest forms of magical practice in the world. The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan also reveals the historical authenticity of what appears in the Ivory Tablets of the Crow and how it is applied to Yi Jing divination. The book gives a thorough, yet mystical, explanation of each of the sixty-four hexagrams and compares them to the Sixty-Four Letters of Genghis Khan. The book also explores the spiritual side of Genghis Khan and his connections to shamanism. Formulas for accessing the vibration of the hexagrams are given, as well as, advanced initiatory practices of Ninzuwu. The book also examines the Yi Jing’s relationship to ancient Sumerian spiritualityand reveals the location of the legendary land of Dilmun, and the possibility of a Yi Jing originating in ancient Mesopotamia. The also book reveals the origin of the Sumerians and where they migrated to after leaving Mesopotamia. Many people who presently use the I Ching in their lives will find this text truly rewarding. Others will now be able to validate the historical authenticity of what appears in the Ivory Tablets of the Crow. People, regardless of their political, racial, religious, and spiritual background can gain some wisdom from the Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan. Another theme that is prominent in the text is the Yi Ching’s relationship to Shinto and the fundamental creed of the Black Dragon Society. The Appendix includes excerpts from a speech given prominent member of the Black Dragon Society and his views on Dr. Mikao Usui. Caution: The Yi Jing Apocrypha of Genghis Khan is also an advanced initiatory path. The Hexegrams are arranged in the order of their initiatory steps. The editor suggests that the book be read first in its entirety before practice.

    The Yi Jing origins are clearly in the China area validated by Thomas Cleary. The book looks to be built on personal opinion not clear facts.

    alricthomas

    October 14, 2013 at 10:05 am

  6. Its not good to get into offensive language. Alric brings up a good point, and of course I’ve read Thomas Clearly’s work. I have it! But there are histories of other origins that are all examined. Not just one speculated origin. Secondly, it’s an apocrypha.

    Warlock Asylum

    October 14, 2013 at 11:05 am

  7. I’ve never heard of the Sixty Four Letters of Genghis Khan [?].

    I am wondering what this has to do with Necronomicon Mysteries? (This is what it says in the title of the page).

    Whenever I do a google search on “Ninzuwu”, I am returned only with:”Sanzuwu”, a three legged crow in Chinese mythology. In Shinto, it is known as Yatagarasu, and this being appears as a three legged crow in Kojiki.

    Yi Jing is credited to Fu Xi and copies have been found in tombs located in what we now know as China. The Mawangdui Silk Texts has been found in Changsha, Hunan.

    Black Dragon Society has absolutely *nothing* to do with the Necronomicon.

    When I do a google search on some of the gods, such as Johuta, I am thinking that perhaps this is really Jakuta or another name for the Yoruba god, Shango?

    There is nothing wrong with questioning, I just want to know where exactly are you getting this information from? It looks to me on the outside you are putting out grimoires just for the sake of putting them out.

    The Urilia Language becomes Asaru Language, which in turn becomes the Vasuh language. The history behind this book changes and none of it is actually solid. Now you are saying that the Art of Ninzuwu is a form of Yi Jing sorcery?

    starintelligence

    October 14, 2013 at 8:12 pm

  8. Warlock Asylum

    October 25, 2013 at 2:22 am


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